Edible and Medicinal Plants — plants

Rumex crispus - Curly Dock

Posted by Clueless Bushcraft on

Early in the spring, I found some broad leaf dock and wrote about it. Right about now, the dock has some green seeds on them and some brown seeds on them. It’s a good time to collect these seeds and use them for food. First, let me say that this picture is of a related dock, called curly dock or Rumex crispus. All docks are in the buckwheat family, Polygonaceae, and curly dock is native to Europe and western Asia. The leaves are narrow and wavy along the edges, which is why it is called curly dock. Docks are biennial, producing...

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Stinging Nettle - Urtica chamaedryoides

Posted by Clueless Bushcraft on

Stinging Nettle Scientific name: Urtica chamaedryoides, U. dioica, U. urensAbundance: commonWhat: leaves and young stemsHow: cooked greens, teaWhere: woods, borders, abandoned areas, woods, sunny and shady areasWhen: spring, early summerNutritional Value: Rich in vitamins A,C,D,K, many minerals, and high in protein.Dangers: can cause skin irritations, handle while wearing leather gloves. Cook to remove stingers before consuming.Medicinal SummaryLeaves - anti-inflammatory; diuretic; local anesthetic; anti-diarrheal; hemostat 

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Chicken of the Woods Mushroom - Laetiporus sulphureus

Posted by Clueless Bushcraft on

Chicken of the Woods Mushroom Scientific Name(s): Laetiporus sulphureusAbundance: uncommonWhat: mushroomHow: cookedWhere: dead trees in the woodsWhen: summerNutritional Value: minerals, vitamins, carbohydratesDangers: Laetiporus mushrooms growing on pines or eucalyptus trees develop compounds which will cause extreme stomach distress, though probably aren't fatal.COLLECTING MUSHROOM REQUIRES 100% CERTAINTY. WWW.CLUELESSBUSHCRAFT.COM ACCEPTS NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR IDENTIFICATION ERRORS BY ANY READERS.

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Sow Thistle - Sonchus oleraceus

Posted by Clueless Bushcraft on

Sow Thistle Scientific name: Sonchus oleraceusAbundance: plentifulWhat: leaves, stems, rootsHow: Young leaves in salads, steamed or boiled; stems can be peeled then steamed like asparagus; roots are very bitter and generally considered to be edible in dire circumstances after roasting or boiling; coffee can be made from roasted roots.Where: yards, fields, disturbed areas, sunnyWhen: Early spring through fallNutritional Value: Rich in vitamins A,Bs,C and some mineralsDangers: Don't mistake poisonous Common Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris) or Texas Groundsel (Senecio ampullaceus) for Sow Thistle.Medicinal Summary:Leaves - antidepressant; antioxidant; antimicrobial; soothes urinary tract inflammations including from kidney stones; sedative; fever reducer; anti-inflammatory; pain reliever (tisane)

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